Funeral Flowers

Overview

Published: 04/05/2010

by Funeral Home Resource Team

Photos

When a death occurs, sending funeral flowers can be perplexing. What is an appropriate flower arrangement for a family member, or for people to whom you are not related such as a co-worker? Funeral Flowers are a good way to express sympathy in a way that words cannot. Most religions allow funeral flowers at the funeral or grave-site (it’s perfectly allowable to call and ask the funeral home or church though, if you are not sure of proper protocol). Funeral Flowers show the family that you care and are sympathetic to what they are going through.

Most florists will always add a sympathy card to your funeral flower order complete with your contact information on the back that will be recorded by the funeral home. The grieving families will appreciate this so they will know who to send acknowledgments to.

Here are some tips for choosing funeral flowers:

• Simple and elegant is usually the best way to go.
• Anyone may send floral baskets or living plants. They are especially appropriate when the sender had a closer relationship to the bereaved than to the deceased.
• Sympathy baskets, sent to the funeral home or the bereaved's home, are appropriate when sent by family, or those who had a deeper, or formal relationship with the deceased.
• Floral wreaths, crosses, and sprays, available in many sizes, are appropriate when sent by anyone other than those not acquainted with the deceased. The exception to this would be associations that would like to honor the deceased for service during their lifetime.
• Floral arrangements known as tributes are generally chosen by good friends or family members. You may memorialize someone by choosing a special design based on an aspect of their personality, their occupation, an association membership, or a hobby.
• In the case of cremation, much depends on whether a funeral service is planned. If so, you may choose a tribute arrangement or any other type of arrangement not reserved for family members. If there will be a memorial service at the bereaved's home, or if there will be no services at all, it is more appropriate to send an all-occasion type floral basket arrangement.
• Follow the wishes of the family. Oftentimes, you will see a directive in an obituary or funeral notice that indicates that the family desires a donation to a charity or something else along these lines in lieu of flowers. If this is what the family desires, then follow their wishes.
• You can also send live plants to the family. This is a lovely way to remember the deceased- and allows a living memorial to the families loved one (assuming someone in the family will tend to it properly). It’s especially fitting if the deceased was an avid gardener.

Funeral flowers come in all shapes and sizes and can fit every budget. Many florists have websites where you can select and order your flowers, but if you don’t see any that you care for, or that are in your budget, call a local florist directly. They will be more than happy to assist you in finding the perfect funeral flower arrangement or gift.